Week 7 Reflection

I think this week flew by, despite the fact that winter seems to be dragging on and on (and on and on and on, I’m tired of this cold!)..

This week I worked on the page WhatMakesWikiWritingSoEasy.  Part of the assignment this week was to revisit every other day, and I did, though I didn’t make changes or additions each time.  I would think about what to add, but I’m guessing that when it comes to homework it’s not the thought that counts.  Still, I did quite a bit of work on the page.  The content included links to outside materials.  I did use chapter 32 from the reading Wikis: Web Collaboration, by Ebersbach, Glaser, Heigl, and Warta .  I think it must have been handed out in class, but I found the reading online (thankful for some open source content here).  I basically took the parts of the reading that discussed what made wikis so difficult, such as having a variety of positions and wiki vandalism, and flipped it to show the positive side.  I also filled in the information with some of my own knowledge regarding wikis.  I had posted at the top of the wiki page that it is a work in progress and invited others to add to it, but I have been the only author on that page so far.  I added the following content:

Accessibility

Almost anybody can add to or edit existing wiki content, or create a wiki page using a new WikiWord. The exception to this would be a wiki that requires a password or invitation to access the editing feature, though the content usually still be viewed by an outside audience. This would be known as a fish bowl wiki. Generally, though, wikis provide a level of accessibility that makes wiki writing easy.

Straightforward

The information on a wiki isn’t usually cluttered with images and instead is generally presented in a straightforward way and under a logical structure. Some may think this looks boring, but actually it can be quite helpful for locating the information you need without becoming distracted. Also, due to the overall absence of color on the page, links to relevant content and outside sources are easier to spot, since link text is in color.

Collective Intelligence

Wiki content is usually the result of a collaborative effort between multiple wiki users. While a printed version of an encyclopedia may need annual updating, a wiki can be reworked and edited to fit and reflect changes immediately. This concept is also referred to as “swarm intelligence” or “the hive mind.”

Nothing is Permanent

No matter how many changes are made to a wiki page, those changes can always be reversed. This could come in handy if, for example, a spammer got hold of an unattended wiki and filled the page with links to viruses, advertisements, or nonsense.

Versatility

Wikis are so versatile! Wikis can be used to compile any kind of information. Wikis can be comprised of personal pages and group discussions, created by teachers as a virtual classroom for their students, organizing information between friends such as when planning a camping trip as shown in the video – Wikis in Plain English. Here is a list of – 50 Ways to Use Wikis for a More Collaborative and Interactive Classroom.”

I had intended to add to other pages as well, but it seemed like many of the topics were pretty well covered.  The most trouble I had this week was collaborating.  I created a wiki page and added content, but nobody else added to it.  It helped me to realize that wikis NEED multiple contributing to the information.  A wiki isn’t just the presentation of information, but a way of working together to present that information.  Since I was the only contributor so far, I didn’t have any other information to build on or rework.  That made building the page more difficult.  I suppose then that I should have added to other pages no matter how well I think the content was worded or how much information had already been given.  It can always be reworked.

 

3 thoughts on “Week 7 Reflection

  1. “A wiki isn’t just the presentation of information, but a way of working together to [do something] information. Since I was the only contributor so far, I didn’t have any other information to build on or rework. That made building the page more difficult. I suppose then that I should have added to other pages no matter how well I think the content was worded or how much information had already been given. It can always be reworked.”

    One take on wikis is this kind of collaboration, and working on your own can get a little lonely. But wikis also supposed SlowConversation. So it’s possible that someone will get back to your page to revise and develop later. Like next year. Or the next.

    • I did notice that after I posted my weekly reflection that Monday morning, a couple others did add to the page. I always think that in the digital world things can happen so fast, I guess I need to work on my wiki patience.

  2. Pingback: Observations on 3 weeks of wikis in #en3177 | The Daybook

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s